The Fires of Life

“But, beloved, we are convinced of better things concerning you, and things that accompany salvation, though we are speaking in this way.”

Whoever the author of Hebrews is, they were clearly beckoning the recipients of this letter to surpass the level of merely drinking milk, and to move on to the solid food that awaited them (see end of Hebrews 5). Although this letter was in the context of Jewish Christians and the struggle they faced in following Old Testament Law as opposed to the new covenant, I think it has volumes to say towards modern day Christians and the fight between conveniently following Jesus and casting your life before Him. As much as I hate to admit, I feel as if often times I barely get up to even raise the milk to my lips.

In small group last week we were discussing this passage and what it meant to live diligently in pouring out one’s life so that another may live. This can be visible in a multitude of ways, but for me, it’s boiled down towards meditation on a couple different Scripture pieces:

“Do nothing from selfishness or empty conceit, but with humility of mind regard one another as more important than yourselves; do not merely look out for your own personal interests, but also for the interests of others.” – Philippians 2:3-4

Do all things without grumbling or disputing; so that you will prove yourselves to be blameless and innocent, children of God above reproach in the midst of a crooked and perverse generation, among whom you appear as lights in the world.” – Philippians 2:14-15

“The one who says he abides in Him ought himself to walk in the same manner as He walked.” – 1 John 2:6

My friend Brian was saying that there’s a sort of peace coming with the fact that the Christian ethic is unattainable, unlike many other faiths; but that the beauty of this is that it places the burden on Christ, right where it belongs. I think we all need to remember that if we even consider pouring out our lives for the sake of another.



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~ by Chris Kyle on July 17, 2010.

2 Responses to “The Fires of Life”

  1. I like these passages. Pour it out. It’s never going to be easy, or make sense, and you probably won’t ever feel completely comfortable at all in taking on this lifestyle, but we’re not looking for comfort anyway, right?

  2. Your friend Brian’s statement stuck out to me when I came across your blog today, Chris. I thought I’d drop a comment to question your reasoning. First, is the Christian ethic another way of saying “the gospel”? Also, if the Christian ethic (or gospel) is unattainable, that means we have little or no responsibility but to accept Jesus/the gospel, right? As in…”God forgives me – I’m only a human sinner saved by grace”?

    That being said…if there’s no burden of responsibility on us as human beings, why are we called the “righteous ones of God” asked to “die with Christ” like Galations 2:20 and 5:24 talks about? Of course we can’t do it ALL, that’s why Jesus died, but isn’t “discipline” and “disciple” coming from the same root? Aren’t we supposed to be slugging it out, doing some SERIOUS training to show others the life-changing cause we received?

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